Quanten.de Diskussionsforum  

Zurück   Quanten.de Diskussionsforum > Quantenmechanik, Relativitätstheorie und der ganze Rest.

Hinweise

Quantenmechanik, Relativitätstheorie und der ganze Rest. Wenn Sie Themen diskutieren wollen, die mehr als Schulkenntnisse voraussetzen, sind Sie hier richtig. Keine Angst, ein Physikstudium ist nicht Voraussetzung, aber man sollte sich schon eingehender mit Physik beschäftigt haben.

Antwort
 
Themen-Optionen Ansicht
  #21  
Alt 17.09.20, 23:50
Benutzerbild von TomS
TomS TomS ist offline
Singularität
 
Registriert seit: 04.10.2014
Ort: Nürnberg
Beiträge: 2.273
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Zur Einleitung ein paar meiner Lieblingsbeispiele aus Dänemark

When asked about an underlying quantum world, Bohr would answer, “There is no quantum world. There is only an abstract quantum physical description. It is wrong to think that the task of physics is to find out how nature is. Physics concerns what we can say about Nature.“
(Niels Bohr)

This work suffers from the fundamental misunderstanding which affects all attempts at ‘axiomatizing’ any part of physics. The ‘axiomatizers’ do not realize that every physical theory must necessarily make use of concepts which cannot in principle be further analyzed. […] The fact, emphasized by Everett, that it is actually possible to set-up a wave function for the experimental apparatus and a Hamiltonian for the interaction between system and apparatus is perfectly trivial, but also terribly treacherous; in fact, it did mislead Everett to the conception that it might be possible to describe apparatus + atomic object as a closed system. […] This, however, is an illusion.
(Leon Rosenfeld über Everett)

Letter Everett to Petersen
Letter Rosenfeld to Bergmann

At that juncture, Zeh's senior at Heidelberg, the Nobel Prize winner J. H. D. Jensen decided to ask Rosenfeld's advice on the paper. Rosenfeld's opinion was devastating. “I have all the reasons in the world to assume that such a concentrate of wildest nonsense [decoherence] is not being distributed around the world with your blessing, and I think to be of service to you by directing your attention to this misfortune.”
(H‐D Zeh, Foundations of Physics, 1, 69–76 (1970). Rosenfeld to Jensen, 14 Feb 1968)

Eine gute Zusammenfassung siehe

Olival Freire Jr.: From the margins to the mainstream: Foundations of quantum mechanics, 1950–1990

Es ist einfach, weitere derartige Zitate bzgl. des Denkverbots aus Kopenhagen zu finden, aber das soll’s erst mal gewesen sein …

… dennoch, Zeilinger (als Beispiel) beruft sich auch heute im Wesentlichen auf diese Ansicht

It is also suggested that the austerity of the Copenhagen interpretation should serve as a guiding principle in a search for deeper understanding.
(Anton Zeilinger)

I have purposely not dealt with questions like: Is there a border between micro- and macro physics? Is a new form of logic necessary for quantum processes? Has one's awareness an active, dynamic influence on the wave function? Such or similar positions were proposed by several physicists, but in my opinion they would all fall victim to Occam's razor: Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem. It is the beauty of the Copenhagen interpretation that it operates with a minimal set of entities and concepts.
(Anton Zeilinger)

Das ist eine explizit instrumentalistische Position “im Geist von Kopenhagen” wenn auch nicht dogmatisch vertreten. Zeilinger weicht letztlich nur insofern ab, als auch makroskopische Objekte der Quantenmechanik gehorchen und durch ihre Gesetze beschrieben werden - falls nicht ein Messprozesses vorliegt. Die o.g. Erklärungslücke, wann genau dies der Fall sein soll, bleibt damit bestehen.


Nachdem wir nun wissen, womit wir es zu tun haben, im Folgenden gegenteilige Ansichten, die „Kopenhagen“ und/oder den Instrumentalismus sowie seine Spielarten explizit ablehnen: Zunächst Einstein sowie einige Philosophen – da wäre auch noch Feyerabend zu nennen, ebenso Quine

The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.
(Albert Einstein)

True ignorance is not the absence of knowledge, but the refusal to acquire it.
(Sir Karl Popper)

It is not intuitive ease I am after, but rather a point of view which is sufficiently definite to clear up some difficulties, and to be criticized in rational terms. (Bohr's complementarity cannot be so criticized, I fear; it can only be accepted or denounced - perhaps as being ad hoc, or as being irrational, or as being hopelessly vague.)
(Sir Karl Popper)

A scientific theory is usually felt to be better than its predecessors not only in the sense that it is a better instrument for discovering and solving puzzles but also because it is somehow a better representation of what nature is really like. One often hears that successive theories grow ever closer to, or approximate more and more closely to, the truth. Apparently, generalizations like that refer not to the puzzle-solutions and the concrete predictions derived from a theory but rather to its ontology, to the match, that is, between the entities with which the theory populates nature and what is “really there.”
(Thomas Kuhn)

There’s nothing particularly quantum-mechanical about instrumentalism. It has a long and rather sorry philosophical history: most contemporary philosophers of science regard it as fairly conclusively refuted. But I think it’s easier to see what’s wrong with it just by noticing that real science just isn’t like this. According to instrumentalism, paleontologists talk about dinosaurs so they can understand fossils […] and particle physicists talk about the Higgs Boson so they can understand the LHC. In each case, it’s quite clear that instrumentalism is the wrong way around. Science is not “about” experiments; science is about the world, and experiments are part of its toolkit.
(David Wallace, einer der führenden Philosophen zur Quantentheorie, mit exzellenter Ausbildung als Physiker)

A physical theory should clearly and forthrightly address two fundamental questions: what there is, and what it does. The answer to the first question is provided by the ontology of the theory, and the answer to the second by its dynamics. The ontology should have a sharp mathematical description, and the dynamics should be implemented by precise equations describing how the ontology will, or might, evolve […]
There is little agreement about just what this approach to quantum theory postulates to actually exist or how the dynamics can be unambiguously formulated. Nowadays, the term is often used as shorthand for a general instrumentalism that treats the mathematical apparatus of the theory as merely a predictive device, uncommitted to any ontology or dynamics at all […] Such an attitude rejects the aspiration to provide a physical theory, as defined above, at all. Hence it is not even in the running for a description of the physical world and what it does.

(Tim Maudelin, ebenfalls einer der führenden Philosophen zur Quantentheorie; s.u.a. Maudlin-Trilemma)

Damit sollte klar sein, dass maßgebliche Positionen gegen den Instrumentalismus existieren - auch wenn sich das nicht überall herumgesprochen hat.



Zur Einstein-Bohr-Debatte

The mid-twentieth century “Bohr-Einstein debate” about quantum theory is often misinterpreted as a personal clash between wizards. So counter-intuitive are quantum theory’s predictions that, under the leadership of one of its pioneers, Neils Bohr, a myth grew that there is no underlying reality that explains them. Particles get from A to B without passing through the intervening space, where they have insufficient energy to exist; they briefly “borrow” the energy, because we are “uncertain” about what their energy is. Information gets from A to B without anything passing in between – what Einstein called “spooky action at a distance.” […] So, while most accounts say that Bohr won the debate, my view is that Einstein, as usual, was seeking an explanation of reality, while his rivals were advocating nonsense.
(David Deutsch)

Der Punkt ist, dass Bohrs Ansicht natürlich funktioniert – was seitens Einstein letztlich nicht in Zweifel gezogen wurde. Einsteins Frage zielte tiefer, aber auf diese Argumentation geht Bohr nicht ein.

Deutsch ist hier nicht der einzige Physiker, der Bohr et al. für diese Haltung kritisiert, bzw. feststellt, dass beide (u.v.a.m) letztlich aneinander vorbeigeredet haben.

Daraus folgen zwei Erkenntnisse: Bohr hatte recht bzgl. des Formalismus und der Vorhersagen der Theorie. Daraus folgt jedoch nichts (!) bzgl. der tieferen Fragen von Einstein. Das wird bis heute oft falsch verstanden, und man findet diverse Zitate namhafter Physiker, die den Unterschied nicht sehen.

Letztlich geht es um die fundamentale Frage nach dem Gegenstand physikalischer Forschung.



Sehr interessant ist John Bells Meinung. Er war wohl für den Nobelpreis nominiert, als er recht früh und unerwartet verstarb.

The Copenhagen interpretation is a very ambiguous term. Some people use it just to mean the sort of practical quantum mechanics that you can do — like you can ride a bicycle without really knowing what you're doing. It's the rules for using quantum mechanics and the experience that we have in using it. […] Then there's another side to the Copenhagen interpretation, which is a philosophy of the whole thing. It tries to be very deep and tell you that these ambiguities, which you worry about, are somehow irreducible. It says that ambiguities are in the nature of things. We, the observers, are also part of nature. It's impossible for us to have any sharp conception of what is going on because we, the observers, are involved. And so there is this philosophy, which was designed to reconcile people to the muddle; You shouldn't strive for clarity— that's naive.
(John Stewart Bell)

Andere sagen es direkter:

Niels Bohr brain-washed a whole generation of physicists into believing that the problem [interpreting quantum theory] had been solved fifty years ago.
(Murray Gell-Mann; The Nature of the Physical Universe, the 1976 Nobel Conference)

Die Kritik richtet sich nicht gegen Details der Theorie, sondern gegen den Diskurs.
__________________
Niels Bohr brainwashed a whole generation of theorists into thinking that the job (interpreting quantum theory) was done 50 years ago.

Geändert von TomS (18.09.20 um 05:56 Uhr)
Mit Zitat antworten
  #22  
Alt 17.09.20, 23:52
Benutzerbild von TomS
TomS TomS ist offline
Singularität
 
Registriert seit: 04.10.2014
Ort: Nürnberg
Beiträge: 2.273
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Auch wenn von ihm keine längeren Beiträge zu diesem Themenkomplex existieren, hat sich Steven Weinberg doch intensiv mit der Problematik befasst.

Zunächst „Kopenhagen“:

All this familiar story is true, but it leaves out an irony. Bohr's version of quantum mechanics was deeply flawed, but not for the reason Einstein thought. The Copenhagen interpretation describes what happens when an observer makes a measurement, but the observer and the act of measurement are themselves treated classically. This is surely wrong: Physicists and their apparatus must be governed by the same quantum mechanical rules that govern everything else in the universe. But these rules are expressed in terms of a wave function (or, more precisely, a state vector) that evolves in a perfectly deterministic way. So where do the probabilistic rules of the Copenhagen interpretation come from? […] The Copenhagen rules clearly work, so they have to be accepted. But this leaves the task of explaining them by applying the deterministic equation for the evolution of the wave function, the Schrödinger equation, to observers and their apparatus.
(Steven Weinberg)

Dann die Frage nach der Erklärung

If the time-dependent Schrödinger equation described the measurement process, then whatever the details of the process, the end result would be some definite state, not a number of possibilities with different probabilities. This is clearly unsatisfactory. If quantum mechanics applies to everything, then it must apply to a physicist’s measurement apparatus, and to physicists themselves. On the other hand, if quantum mechanics does not apply to everything, then we need to know where to draw the boundary of its area of validity. Does it apply only to systems that are not too large? Does it apply if a measurement is made by some automatic apparatus, and no human reads the result?
(Steven Weinberg)

Und zuletzt die Philosophie dahinter:

Where then does this radical attack on the objectivity of scientific knowledge come from? One source I think is the old bugbear of positivism, this time applied to the study of science itself. If one refuses to talk about anything that is not directly observed, then quantum field theories or principles of symmetry or more generally laws of nature cannot be taken seriously […] But scientists have the direct experience of scientific theories as desired yet elusive goals, and they become convinced of the reality of these theories.
(Steven Weinberg)

Weinberg fragt nach einer Erklärung – das ist natürlich keine instrumentalistische Position.



Sehr intensiv hat sich David Deutsch damit auseinandergesetzt, warum er eine rein positivistische Position, die keine Erklärungen liefert, für absurd hält.

Let me define ‘bad philosophy’ as philosophy that is not merely false, but actively prevents the growth of other knowledge. In this case, instrumentalism was acting to prevent the explanations in Schrödinger’s and Heisenberg’s theories from being improved or elaborated or unified. The physicist Niels Bohr […] then developed an ‘interpretation’ of the theory which later became known as the ‘Copenhagen interpretation’. It said that quantum theory, including the rule of thumb, was a complete description of reality. Bohr excused the various contradictions and gaps by using a combination of instrumentalism and studied ambiguity. He denied the ‘possibility of speaking of phenomena as existing objectively’ —but said that only the outcomes of observations should count as phenomena. He also said that, although observation has no access to ‘the real essence of phenomena’, it does reveal relationships between them, and that, in addition, quantum theory blurs the distinction between observer and observed. As for what would happen if one observer performed a quantum-level observation on another, he avoided the issue […]
Some people may enjoy conjuring tricks without ever wanting to know how they work. Similarly, during the twentieth century, most philosophers, and many scientists, took the view that science is incapable of discovering anything about reality. Starting from empiricism, they drew the inevitable conclusion (which would nevertheless have horrified the early empiricists) that science cannot validly do more than predict the outcomes of observations, and that it should never purport to describe the reality that brings those outcomes about. This is known as instrumentalism. It denies that what I have been calling ‘explanation’ can exist at all. It is still very influential.

(David Deutsch)

The overwhelming majority of theories are rejected because they contain bad explanations, not because they fail experimental tests.
David Deutsch

Science is objective. And in my view, we cannot take any experimental results seriously except in the light of good explanations of them.
(David Deutsch)



Zuletzt Zeh; wir erinnern uns an “such a concentrate of wildest nonsense”.

The dishonesty of the Copenhagen interpretation consists in switching concepts on demand and regarding the (genuine or apparent) collapse as a “normal increase of information” – as though the wave function represented no more than an ensemble of possible states.
(Dieter Zeh)

According to my attempts to understand them, reality is systematically denied in the Copenhagen interpretation in order to circumvent consistency problems […]. If there is no reality, one does not need a consistent description!
(Dieter Zeh)

I expect that the Copenhagen interpretation will some time be called the greatest sophism in the history of science, but I would consider it a terrible injustice if—when some day a solution should be found—some people claim that ‘this is of course what Bohr always meant’, only because he was sufficiently vague.
(Dieter Zeh)

Zunächst mal keine weitere Diskussion, lediglich die Feststellung, dass der Instrumentalismus – seit langem – keineswegs eine unumstrittene philosophische Position einnimmt, noch die instrumentalistische Auslegung a la „Kopenhagen“ eine Deutungshoheit beanspruchen kann.



Abschließend die zentrale Fragestellung

This poses the obvious problems of (i) when is an interaction between two systems to count as a measurement by one system of a property of the other? and (ii) what happens if there is an attempt to restore a degree of unity by describing the measurement process in quantum mechanical terms rather than the language of classical physics which is normally used? There is no universally accepted answer to either of these questions.
(Chris Isham)

The first charge against 'measurement', in the fundamental axioms of quantum mechanics, is that it anchors there the shifty split of the world into 'system' and 'apparatus'. A second charge is that the word comes loaded with meaning from everyday life, meaning which is entirely inappropriate in the quantum context.
(John Bell)



Wir stehen selbst enttäuscht und sehn betroffen
Den Vorhang zu und alle Fragen offen.
__________________
Niels Bohr brainwashed a whole generation of theorists into thinking that the job (interpreting quantum theory) was done 50 years ago.

Geändert von TomS (18.09.20 um 06:27 Uhr)
Mit Zitat antworten
  #23  
Alt 18.09.20, 13:25
reinhard reinhard ist offline
Profi-Benutzer
 
Registriert seit: 11.11.2011
Beiträge: 160
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Zitat:
Zitat von TomS Beitrag anzeigen
Zeilinger:

Die Annahme, dass sich diese Wahrscheinlichkeitswellen tatsächlich im Raum ausbreiten, ist also nicht notwendig - denn alles, wozu sie dienen, ist das Berechnen von Wahrscheinlichkeiten. Es ist daher viel einfacher und klarer, die Wellenfunktion ψ nicht als etwas Realistisches zu betrachten, das in Raum und Zeit existiert, sondern lediglich als mathematisches Hilfsmittel, mit Hilfe dessen man Wahrscheinlichkeiten berechnen kann. Zugespitzt formuliert, wenn wir über ein bestimmtes Experiment nachdenken, befindet sich ψ nicht da draußen in der Welt, sondern nur in unserem Kopf […] Der Kollaps der Wellenfunktion ist aber dann nicht etwas, was im wirklichen Raum stattfindet.”
Verstehe nicht dass Zeilinger als gelernter Mathematiker einen Raum bestehend aus Möglichkeiten nicht als real akzeptiert.
Alle anderen Sichtweisen die ich kenne führen zu Mißverständnissen
und benötigen nur unnötigen Input.
Mit Zitat antworten
  #24  
Alt 18.09.20, 13:42
Benutzerbild von TomS
TomS TomS ist offline
Singularität
 
Registriert seit: 04.10.2014
Ort: Nürnberg
Beiträge: 2.273
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Zitat:
Zitat von reinhard Beitrag anzeigen
Verstehe nicht dass Zeilinger als gelernter Mathematiker einen Raum bestehend aus Möglichkeiten nicht als real akzeptiert.
Alle anderen Sichtweisen die ich kenne führen zu Mißverständnissen
und benötigen nur unnötigen Input.
Er akzeptiert diesen Raum sicher als “real” im Sinne der Mathematik, lehnt — als Instrumentalist — jedoch die Vorstellung ab, dass dieser “mathematische” Raum auch eine tatsächlich in der Natur vorhandene Realität repräsentiert.

Siehe oben:

Zitat:
When asked about an underlying quantum world, Bohr would answer, “There is no quantum world. There is only an abstract quantum physical description. It is wrong to think that the task of physics is to find out how nature is. Physics concerns what we can say about Nature.“
(Niels Bohr)
__________________
Niels Bohr brainwashed a whole generation of theorists into thinking that the job (interpreting quantum theory) was done 50 years ago.

Geändert von TomS (18.09.20 um 14:08 Uhr)
Mit Zitat antworten
  #25  
Alt 19.09.20, 15:35
Timm Timm ist offline
Singularität
 
Registriert seit: 26.03.2009
Ort: Weinstraße, Rheinld.Pfalz
Beiträge: 2.773
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Zitat:
Zitat von TomS Beitrag anzeigen
Wir stehen selbst enttäuscht und sehn betroffen
Den Vorhang zu und alle Fragen offen.
Was nützen denn die Interpretationen?
Wir sollten unsre Nerven schonen
und wenn wir wieder etwas messen
das wie warum vergessen.
__________________
Der Verstand schafft die Wahrheit nicht, sondern er findet sie vor - Aurelius Augustinus
Mit Zitat antworten
  #26  
Alt 19.09.20, 15:48
Benutzerbild von TomS
TomS TomS ist offline
Singularität
 
Registriert seit: 04.10.2014
Ort: Nürnberg
Beiträge: 2.273
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Zitat:
Zitat von Timm Beitrag anzeigen
Was nützen denn die Interpretationen?
Wir sollten unsre Nerven schonen
und wenn wir wieder etwas messen
das wie warum vergessen.
Steht schon oben:

The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.
__________________
Niels Bohr brainwashed a whole generation of theorists into thinking that the job (interpreting quantum theory) was done 50 years ago.
Mit Zitat antworten
  #27  
Alt 23.09.20, 09:17
Hawkwind Hawkwind ist offline
Singularität
 
Registriert seit: 22.07.2010
Ort: Rabenstein, Niederösterreich
Beiträge: 2.408
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Zitat:
Zitat von Timm Beitrag anzeigen
Den ersten Satz verstehe ich nicht. Sagt das jemand?
Zitat:
Zitat von Hawkwind
Der Kollaps ist keine Rechenvorschrift; er ist ja eher Metaphysik.
...
Da die Standard-Interpretationen via Experiment nicht voneinander zu unterscheiden sind (so auch die Relevanz des Kollaps) ordnen Autoren sie gelegentlich der Metaphysik zu, auch wenn das sicher nicht ganz mit dem übereinstimmt, was Philosophen unter Metaphysik verstehen.

Bin nicht sicher, ob das überhaupt noch stimmt. Ich meine, gelesen zu haben, dass etwa Interferenzen zwischen den Welten der Viele-Welten-Deutung im Prinzip durchaus beobachtbar sein müssen: wie immer keine Ahnung.
Mit Zitat antworten
  #28  
Alt 23.09.20, 10:55
Benutzerbild von TomS
TomS TomS ist offline
Singularität
 
Registriert seit: 04.10.2014
Ort: Nürnberg
Beiträge: 2.273
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Zitat:
Zitat von Hawkwind Beitrag anzeigen
Da die Standard-Interpretationen via Experiment nicht voneinander zu unterscheiden sind (so auch die Relevanz des Kollaps) ordnen Autoren sie gelegentlich der Metaphysik zu, auch wenn das sicher nicht ganz mit dem übereinstimmt, was Philosophen unter Metaphysik verstehen.

Bin nicht sicher, ob das überhaupt noch stimmt. Ich meine, gelesen zu haben, dass etwa Interferenzen zwischen den Welten der Viele-Welten-Deutung im Prinzip durchaus beobachtbar sein müssen: wie immer keine Ahnung.
Ich denke, der "Kollaps" ist nur dann Metaphysik, wenn man ihn realistisch interpretiert (aber dann ist eigtl. die realistische Interpretation als Ganzes Metaphysik).

Niemand hat ein Problem damit, den Kollaps als Rechenvorschrift anzuwenden; man kann ihn ja "von Neumannsches Projektionspostulat" nennen, das klingt weniger metaphysisch aufgeladen.

Und ja, es hat häufig wenig mit der Metaphysik der Philosophen zu tun sondern eher mit einem abwertenden Sprachgebrauch (siehe auch die Story zu Feynman und seinem Philosophieseminar). Der Punkt ist, dass viele Physiker, die ich kenne, und die der shut-up-and-calculate Deutung anhängen, von Interpretationen der Quantenmechanik (auch von "Kopenhagen", was ohnehin nur eine krude Sammlung teilweise widersprüchlicher Ideen ist), von Philosophie und Metaphysik nicht den Hauch einer Ahnung haben. D.h. nicht dass "shut-up-and-calculate" nicht als persönliche Position zulässig wäre. Es heißt jedoch, dass jemand, der von nichts Ahnung hat, weil es ihn nicht interessiert, und der der deswegen "shut-up-and-calculate" predigt, sich aus allen weiteren Diskussionen, von denen er keine Ahnung hat, raushalten soll. Leider sind viele Diskussionen - nicht hier (!) - gerade deswegen so mühsam.

Dazu kommt, dass - und dazu dienten meine Beiträge oben - die Ansicht, Positivismus (bei den Philosophen) und Instrumentalismus (bei den Physikern) wäre die vorherrschende Einstellung.

Bei ersteren ist das sicher falsch, und zwar schon seit Jahrzehnten, nur hat es von den meisten Physikern keiner gemerkt, weil sie sich nie (!) damit befasst haben (welcher Physiker hat wirklich dazu Bücher gelesen oder Seminare besucht?? n meinem Studium im Rahmen der Physikveranstaltungen niemand, weil es nicht angeboten wurde; eine Handvoll evtl. bei den Philosophen, dann jedoch nicht zur Quantenmechanik).

Und bei letzterem muss man m.E. unterscheiden zwischen "ich vertrete eine bestimmte Interpretation, nachdem ich mich damit befasst habe" und "shut-up-and-calculate, mir doch egal". Rechnet man letztere raus - was fair ist - dann sieht die Sache ganz sicher anders aus.



Zum letzten Punkt der experimentellen Unterscheidung zwischen Kollaps- und der Everettschen-Quantenmechanik: Letztere besagt explizit, dass nie - unter keinen Umständen - ein tatsächlicher Kollaps stattfindet. Sämtliche Kollaps-Interpretationen nehmen jedoch an, dass im Zuge der Messung irgendwie und irgendwann ein Kollaps stattfindet. Daraus folgt rein logisch, dass eine experimentelle Unterscheidung prinzipiell möglich ist.

Allerdings haben wir zwei Probleme:
1) Die Szenarien bzw. Effekte sind messtechnisch nicht (wahrscheinlich nie) zugänglich
2) Die Kollaps-Interpretatione legen sich nie fest, was genau einen Kollaps verursacht und wann genau dieser eintritt
__________________
Niels Bohr brainwashed a whole generation of theorists into thinking that the job (interpreting quantum theory) was done 50 years ago.
Mit Zitat antworten
  #29  
Alt 23.09.20, 18:41
Timm Timm ist offline
Singularität
 
Registriert seit: 26.03.2009
Ort: Weinstraße, Rheinld.Pfalz
Beiträge: 2.773
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Zitat:
Zitat von TomS Beitrag anzeigen
Ich denke, der "Kollaps" ist nur dann Metaphysik, wenn man ihn realistisch interpretiert (aber dann ist eigtl. die realistische Interpretation als Ganzes Metaphysik).

Niemand hat ein Problem damit, den Kollaps als Rechenvorschrift anzuwenden; man kann ihn ja "von Neumannsches Projektionspostulat" nennen, das klingt weniger metaphysisch aufgeladen.
Heißt "realistisch interpretiert" die Wellenfunktion breitet sich real im Raum aus und zieht sich bei der Messung instantan auf einen Punkt zusammen?

Genau das verneint Zeilinger. Für ihn bedeutet Kollaps lediglich, dass die Wahrscheinlichkeit 1 eingetreten ist und dieses "mentale Konstrukt damit seinen Zweck erfüllt hat. In diesem Sinne ist der Kollaps eine "simple Denknotwendigkeit".
__________________
Der Verstand schafft die Wahrheit nicht, sondern er findet sie vor - Aurelius Augustinus
Mit Zitat antworten
  #30  
Alt 23.09.20, 18:59
Benutzerbild von TomS
TomS TomS ist offline
Singularität
 
Registriert seit: 04.10.2014
Ort: Nürnberg
Beiträge: 2.273
Standard AW: Kollaps der Wellenfunktion am Doppelspalt

Zitat:
Zitat von Timm Beitrag anzeigen
Heißt "realistisch interpretiert" die Wellenfunktion breitet sich real im Raum aus und zieht sich bei der Messung instantan auf einen Punkt zusammen?
Ja.

Eine realistische Interpretation bedeutet, dass die Regeln der Quantenmechanik genau das beschreiben, was tatsächlich passiert, d.h. 1) vor der Messung breitet sich das Quantensystem real im Raum aus und 2) zieht sich bei der Messung instantan auf einen Punkt zusammen.

Dazu gibt es verschiedene Schulen:
- die einen lehnen diese realistische Interpretation ab,
- andere akzeptieren sie, d.h. (1) und lehnen lediglich den Kollaps (2) ab,
- wieder andere ...

Zitat:
Zitat von Timm Beitrag anzeigen
Genau das verneint Zeilinger. Für ihn bedeutet Kollaps lediglich, dass die Wahrscheinlichkeit 1 eingetreten ist und dieses "mentale Konstrukt damit seinen Zweck erfüllt hat. In diesem Sinne ist der Kollaps eine "simple Denknotwendigkeit".
Ja, Zeilinger ist - wie wir oben gesehen haben - Instrumentalist der alten Schule (außer dass er die Quantenmechanik nicht von der makroskopisch-klassischen Welt trennen möchte, ohne jedoch die daraus resultierenden Inkonsistenzen lösen zu können - was für ihn als Instrumentalist nicht notwendig erscheint).
__________________
Niels Bohr brainwashed a whole generation of theorists into thinking that the job (interpreting quantum theory) was done 50 years ago.

Geändert von TomS (23.09.20 um 19:02 Uhr)
Mit Zitat antworten
Antwort

Lesezeichen

Stichworte
doppelspaltexperiment, wellenfunktion

Themen-Optionen
Ansicht

Forumregeln
Es ist Ihnen nicht erlaubt, neue Themen zu verfassen.
Es ist Ihnen nicht erlaubt, auf Beiträge zu antworten.
Es ist Ihnen nicht erlaubt, Anhänge hochzuladen.
Es ist Ihnen nicht erlaubt, Ihre Beiträge zu bearbeiten.

BB-Code ist an.
Smileys sind an.
[IMG] Code ist an.
HTML-Code ist aus.

Gehe zu


Alle Zeitangaben in WEZ +1. Es ist jetzt 03:44 Uhr.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 (Deutsch)
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
ScienceUp - Dr. Günter Sturm